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Academic Paper


Title: Innovative constructions in Dutch Turkish: An assessment of ongoing contact-induced change
Author: A. Seza Doğruöz
Email: click here to access email
Institution: Universiteit van Tilburg
Author: Ad Backus
Institution: Universiteit van Tilburg
Linguistic Field: Cognitive Science; Syntax
Subject Language: Dutch
Turkish
Abstract: Turkish as spoken in the Netherlands (NL-Turkish) sounds “different” (unconventional) to Turkish speakers in Turkey (TR-Turkish). We claim that this is due to structural contact-induced change that is, however, located within specific lexically complex units copied from Dutch. This article investigates structural change in NL-Turkish through analyses of spoken corpora collected in the bilingual Turkish community in the Netherlands and in a monolingual community in Turkey. The analyses reveal that at the current stage of contact, NL-Turkish is not copying Dutch syntax as such, but rather translates lexically complex individual units into Turkish. Perceived semantic equivalence between Dutch units and their Turkish equivalents plays a crucial role in this translation process. Counter to expectations, the TR-Turkish data also contained unconventional units, though they differed in type, and were much less frequent than those in NL-Turkish. We conclude that synchronic variation in individual NL-Turkish units can contain the seeds of future syntactic change, which will only be visible after an increase in the type and token frequency of the changing units.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Bilingualism: Language and Cognition Vol. 12, Issue 1, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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