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Latin: A Linguistic Introduction

By Renato Oniga and Norma Shifano

Applies the principles of contemporary linguistics to the study of Latin and provides clear explanations of grammatical rules alongside diagrams to illustrate complex structures.


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The Ancient Language, and the Dialect of Cornwall, with an Enlarged Glossary of Cornish Provincial Words

By Frederick W.P. Jago

Containing around 3,700 dialect words from both Cornish and English,, this glossary was published in 1882 by Frederick W. P. Jago (1817–92) in an effort to describe and preserve the dialect as it too declined and it is an invaluable record of a disappearing dialect and way of life.


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Linguistic Bibliography for the Year 2013

The Linguistic Bibliography is by far the most comprehensive bibliographic reference work in the field. This volume contains up-to-date and extensive indexes of names, languages, and subjects.


Academic Paper


Title: A structural approach to the automatic adjudication of word sense disagreements
Author: Roberto Navigli
Institution: Università degli Studi di Roma - La Sapienza
Linguistic Field: Lexicography; Text/Corpus Linguistics
Abstract: The semantic annotation of texts with senses from a computational lexicon is a complex and often subjective task. As a matter of fact, the fine granularity of the WordNet sense inventory [Fellbaum, Christiane (ed.). 1998. MIT Press], a standard within the research community, is one of the main causes of a low inter-tagger agreement ranging between 70% and 80% and the disappointing performance of automated fine-grained disambiguation systems (around 65% state of the art in the Senseval-3 English all-words task). In order to improve the performance of both manual and automated sense taggers, either we change the sense inventory (e.g. adopting a new dictionary or clustering WordNet senses) or we aim at resolving the disagreements between annotators by dealing with the fineness of sense distinctions. The former approach is not viable in the short term, as wide-coverage resources are not publicly available and no large-scale reliable clustering of WordNet senses has been released to date. The latter approach requires the ability to distinguish between subtle or misleading sense distinctions. In this paper, we propose the use of structural semantic interconnections – a specific kind of lexical chains – for the adjudication of disagreed sense assignments to words in context. The approach relies on the exploitation of the lexicon structure as a support to smooth possible divergencies between sense annotators and foster coherent choices. We perform a twofold experimental evaluation of the approach applied to manual annotations from the SemCor corpus, and automatic annotations from the Senseval-3 English all-words competition. Both sets of experiments and results are entirely novel: structural adjudication allows to improve the state-of-the-art performance in all-words disambiguation by 3.3 points (achieving a 68.5% F1-score) and attains figures around 80% precision and 60% recall in the adjudication of disagreements from human annotators.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Natural Language Engineering Vol. 14, Issue 4, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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