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Latin: A Linguistic Introduction

By Renato Oniga and Norma Shifano

Applies the principles of contemporary linguistics to the study of Latin and provides clear explanations of grammatical rules alongside diagrams to illustrate complex structures.


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The Ancient Language, and the Dialect of Cornwall, with an Enlarged Glossary of Cornish Provincial Words

By Frederick W.P. Jago

Containing around 3,700 dialect words from both Cornish and English,, this glossary was published in 1882 by Frederick W. P. Jago (1817–92) in an effort to describe and preserve the dialect as it too declined and it is an invaluable record of a disappearing dialect and way of life.


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Linguistic Bibliography for the Year 2013

The Linguistic Bibliography is by far the most comprehensive bibliographic reference work in the field. This volume contains up-to-date and extensive indexes of names, languages, and subjects.


Academic Paper


Title: Analogy, Frequency, and Sound Change. The case of Dutch devoicing
Author: Johan De Schryver
Institution: Hogeschool-Universiteit Brussel
Author: Anneke Neijt
Institution: Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen
Author: Pol Ghesquière
Institution: Université Catholique de Louvain
Author: Mirjam Ernestus
Institution: Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen
Linguistic Field: Phonetics
Subject Language: Dutch
Abstract: This study investigates the roles of phonetic analogy and lexical frequency in an ongoing sound change, the devoicing of fricatives in Dutch, which occurs mainly in the Netherlands and to a lesser degree in Flanders. In the experiment, Dutch and Flemish students read two variants of 98 words: the standard and a nonstandard form with the incorrect voice value of the fricative. Dutch students chose the non-standard forms with devoiced fricatives more often than Flemish students. Moreover, devoicing, though a gradual process, appeared lexically diffused, affecting first the words that are low in frequency and phonetically similar to words with voiceless fricatives.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Journal of Germanic Linguistics Vol. 20, Issue 2, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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