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Academic Paper


Title: Assessing the presence of lexical competition across languages: Evidence from the Stroop task
Author: Albert Costa
Institution: Universitat Pompeu Fabra
Author: Bárbara Albareda
Institution: Universitat de Barcelona
Author: Mikel Santesteban
Institution: University of Edinburgh
Linguistic Field: Psycholinguistics
Subject Language: Spanish
Catalan-Valencian-Balear
Abstract: Do the lexical representations of the non-response language enter into lexical competition during speech production? This issue has been studied by means of the picture–word interference paradigm in which two paradoxical effects have been observed. The so-called CROSS-LANGUAGE IDENTITY EFFECT (Costa, Miozzo and Caramazza, 1999) has been taken as evidence against cross-linguistic lexical competition. In contrast, the so-called PHONO-TRANSLATION EFFECT (Hermans, Bongaerts, De Bot and Schreuder, 1998) has been interpreted as revealing lexical competition across languages. In this article, we assess the reliability of these two effects by testing Spanish–Catalan highly-proficient bilinguals performing a Stroop task. The results of the experiment are clear: while the cross-language identity facilitation effect is reliably replicated, the phono-translation interference effect is absent from the Stroop task. From these results, we conclude that we should be cautious when drawing strong conclusions about the presence of competition across languages based on the phono-translation effect observed in the picture–word interference paradigm.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Bilingualism: Language and Cognition Vol. 11, Issue 1, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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