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Academic Paper


Title: A road to understanding: A qualitative study into why learners drop out of a blended language learning (BLL) environment
Author: Elke Stracke
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://www.canberra.edu.au/faculties/comm-international/tesol-flt
Institution: University of Canberra
Linguistic Field: Applied Linguistics
Abstract: This paper addresses the views of students of blended language learning (BLL) – a particular learning and teaching environment, that combines face-to-face (f2f) and computer-assisted language learning (CALL). In this instance, the 'blend' consisted of learners’ independent self-study phases at a computer, with a CD-ROM, and traditional f2f classroom learning. This paper explores this BLL environment from the participants’ perspective and focuses on three learners who left the class. The aim of the study was to understand the reasons behind those students’ decision to leave, so that ideas might be developed for the successful implementation of BLL environments in the future that would appeal to all learners. The analysis showed that students left the class for three reasons: a perceived lack of support and connection/complementarity between the f2f and computer-assisted components of the 'blend'; a perceived lack of usage of the paper medium for reading and writing; and the rejection of the computer as a medium of language learning. The paper concludes by pointing out implications for the possible future of BLL.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in ReCALL Vol. 19, Issue 1, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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