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The Social Origins of Language

By Daniel Dor

Presents a new theoretical framework for the origins of human language and sets key issues in language evolution in their wider context within biological and cultural evolution


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Preposition Placement in English: A Usage-Based Approach

By Thomas Hoffmann

This is the first study that empirically investigates preposition placement across all clause types. The study compares first-language (British English) and second-language (Kenyan English) data and will therefore appeal to readers interested in world Englishes. Over 100 authentic corpus examples are discussed in the text, which will appeal to those who want to see 'real data'


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Free Access 4 You

Free access to several Brill linguistics journals, such as Journal of Jewish Languages, Language Dynamics and Change, and Brill’s Annual of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics.


Academic Paper


Title: language teaching
Author: Daniel Nettle
Email: click here to access email
Institution: Newcastle University
Linguistic Field: Applied Linguistics
Abstract: In this issue's state-of-the-art article, Larry Vandergrift suggests that L2 listening remains the least understood and the least researched of all four skills. His paper focuses on a number of areas central to the topic, including the implicit nature of the listening product and process, the cognitive dimensions of the listening skill, listening tasks and the assessment of the skill.

The present issue of Language Teaching sees the start of a new series, surveying recent research in some of the most widely-taught L2s. It can be argued that nowadays too much L2 research is focussed on English, and there is very often an implied assumption that ‘one size fits all’ in methodological terms for all languages, which is clearly not the case. We also feel that this journal needs to serve its readers more comprehensively by providing an accessible and regular means of obtaining information about research into languages other than English. Michael Evans opens the series with a review of research on L2 French; reviews of research into L2 German, Spanish, Japanese, Italian and Chinese are currently being prepared.

This issue also sees the start of another regular section, wherein we will be publishing plenary and invited speeches from recent language teaching and second language acquisition conferences around the world. Many of these speeches are of fundamental interest to a community wider than those present at such events. To begin the series, Fred Davidson with Glenn Fulcher discuss the flexible language of the Common European Framework of References for Languages and explore the pragmatic utility of such language to guide language test development, and William Littlewood discusses the problems encountered in incorporating new methodologies developed in Europe into East Asian educational institutions. In future issues, we will be presenting speeches from events as diverse as the annual conference of the American Association for Applied Linguistics and the conference of the Applied Linguistics Association of New Zealand, and papers based on the invited speakers' lecture series at the University of Berkeley and the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Richard Johnstone's article in which he reviews research on language teaching, learning and policy published in 2004 and 2005 is available online in Language Teaching 39.4 (2006), at .

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Language Teaching Vol. 40, Issue 3, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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