Publishing Partner: Cambridge University Press CUP Extra Publisher Login
amazon logo
More Info

New from Oxford University Press!


It's Been Said Before

By Orin Hargraves

It's Been Said Before "examines why certain phrases become clichés and why they should be avoided -- or why they still have life left in them."

New from Cambridge University Press!


Sounds Fascinating

By J. C. Wells

How do you pronounce biopic, synod, and Breughel? - and why? Do our cake and archaic sound the same? Where does the stress go in stalagmite? What's odd about the word epergne? As a finale, the author writes a letter to his 16-year-old self.

Academic Paper

Title: Editorial
Author: Martha Crago
Institution: Dalhousie University
Linguistic Field: Not Applicable
Abstract: It gives me great pleasure to introduce this Special Issue of Applied Psycholinguistics. One might say that it was very Canadian in its conception. The period between Christmas and New Years 2004 was particularly cold in Montreal and Toronto. It was during this very cold snap that Ellen Bialystok, Fred Genesee, and I decided to apply to the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada for special funding to host a conference on bilingualism. To make matters worse, one of our universities only heated its offices to the bare minimum during the holidays, and Ellen Bialystok's furnace broke down. With cold fingers, time running short, and the holiday period in full swing, we nevertheless managed to contact a dozen leading researchers from several countries who consented to become main speakers at the conference, Language Acquisition and Bilingualism: Consequences for a Multilingual Society, held in Toronto in May 2006 (a much warmer event). These researchers were joined by more than 300 people from 34 countries around the world, 119 of whom presented posters of their research (chosen from 250 submissions). The eager response of our research and practitioner communities for the conference and the compelling importance of the policy, educational, and program implications of bilingualism in a global context convinced me, as Editor of the Journal, that we should share the interest of the conference with you, the readers of Applied Psycholinguistics. This Special Issue contains articles by a number of the conference's speakers, and it was jointly edited by Ellen Bialystok and me with the help of Fred Genesee.


This article appears IN Applied Psycholinguistics Vol. 28, Issue 3.

Return to TOC.

Add a new paper
Return to Academic Papers main page
Return to Directory of Linguists main page