Publishing Partner: Cambridge University Press CUP Extra Publisher Login
amazon logo
More Info


New from Oxford University Press!

ad

Speaking American: A History of English in the United States

By Richard W. Bailey

"Takes a novel approach to the history of American English by focusing on hotbeds of linguistic activity throughout American history."


New from Cambridge University Press!

ad

Language, Literacy, and Technology

By Richard Kern

"In this book, Richard Kern explores how technology matters to language and the ways in which we use it. Kern reveals how material, social and individual resources interact in the design of textual meaning, and how that interaction plays out across contexts of communication, different situations of technological mediation, and different moments in time."


Academic Paper


Title: Language and Ethnic Identity in Taiwan
Paper URL: http://www2.twl.ncku.edu.tw/~uibun/chuliau/lunsoat/english/lgid/abstract.htm
Author: Wi-vun Taiffalo Chiung
Email: click here TO access email
Homepage: http://uibun.twl.ncku.edu.tw/
Institution: National Cheng Kung University
Linguistic Field: Anthropological Linguistics
Subject Language: Chinese, Min Nan
Abstract: Taiwan is a multilingual and multicultural society. There are currently four basic ethnic groups: indigenous people (1.7% of the population), Hakka (12%), Holo (73.3%), and Mainlanders (13%). Unlike the first three groups, which have resided in Taiwan for hundreds of years, Mainlanders are the latest immigrant group which moved to Taiwan with the Chinese KMT regime in the 1940s. Under KTMs monolingual policy, the foreign Mandarin language was adopted as the official language of Taiwan in 1945. This paper examines the relationships among three characteristics, i.e. mother tongue, language ability, and ethnic identity among the Hakka, Holo, and Mainlanders. An investigation was conducted with a total of 244 students with different ethnic backgrounds from Tamkang and Tamsui Universities in Taiwan. The subjects mother tongue, language ability, and ethnic identity were determined by their self-reports on a survey. The results of chi-square tests show that there are significantly different relationship patterns on the three characteristics among the Hakka, Holo, and Mainlanders categories.
Type: Individual Paper
Status: Completed
URL: http://www2.twl.ncku.edu.tw/~uibun/chuliau/lunsoat/english/lgid/abstract.htm


Add a new paper
Return to Academic Papers main page
Return to Directory of Linguists main page