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Words in Time and Place: Exploring Language Through the Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary

By David Crystal

Offers a unique view of the English language and its development, and includes witty commentary and anecdotes along the way.


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The Indo-European Controversy: Facts and Fallacies in Historical Linguistics

By Asya Pereltsvaig and Martin W. Lewis

This book "asserts that the origin and spread of languages must be examined primarily through the time-tested techniques of linguistic analysis, rather than those of evolutionary biology" and "defends traditional practices in historical linguistics while remaining open to new techniques, including computational methods" and "will appeal to readers interested in world history and world geography."


Academic Paper


Title: Patrick Stevenson & John Theobald (eds.), Relocating Germanness: Discursive disunity in unified Germany.
Author: Ingrid Piller
Email: click here TO access email
Homepage: http://www.languageonthemove.com/ingrid-piller
Institution: Macquarie University
Linguistic Field: Discourse Analysis; Sociolinguistics
Subject Language: German
Abstract: Stevenson's & Theobald's volume, the outcome of a 1998 Southampton conference entitled Disunification: Competing constructions of contemporary Germany, is a rich and diverse collection of current sociolinguistic and discourse-analytic research into the German language. It aims to explore Germany's continued cultural and linguistic East/West divide, a decade after unification. The volume's 13 contributions are divided into two parts: critical discourse-analytic approaches to public discourses, and micro-analytic approaches to private or semi-public speech genres and communicative practices. The contributions in the first part are presented as "part of the analytical creation of … discourses" which seek to "punctur[e] the dominant western story, and by this very act, creating space for the expression of other memories, experiences and historiographies, and the emergence of alternative discourses" (p. 8). In contrast, the chapters in the second part have the more descriptive aim of documenting linguistic difference in East and West. The editors contend that "profound differences in communicative practices and behaviours between east and west Germans" exist, or are perceived to exist, and that these differences "constitute a significant barrier to the project of bringing a united … Germany into existence".

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Language in Society Vol. 31, Issue 2, which you can READ on Cambridge's site .



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