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Language Planning as a Sociolinguistic Experiment

By: Ernst Jahr

Provides richly detailed insight into the uniqueness of the Norwegian language development. Marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of the Norwegian nation following centuries of Danish rule


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Acquiring Phonology: A Cross-Generational Case-Study

By Neil Smith

The study also highlights the constructs of current linguistic theory, arguing for distinctive features and the notion 'onset' and against some of the claims of Optimality Theory and Usage-based accounts.


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Language Production and Interpretation: Linguistics meets Cognition

By Henk Zeevat

The importance of Henk Zeevat's new monograph cannot be overstated. [...] I recommend it to anyone who combines interests in language, logic, and computation [...]. David Beaver, University of Texas at Austin


Academic Paper


Title: 'Patrick Stevenson & John Theobald (eds.), Relocating Germanness: Discursive disunity in unified Germany.'
Author: IngridPiller
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: 'http://www.languageonthemove.com/ingrid-piller'
Institution: 'Macquarie University'
Linguistic Field: 'Discourse Analysis; Sociolinguistics'
Subject Language: 'German'
Abstract: Stevenson's & Theobald's volume, the outcome of a 1998 Southampton conference entitled Disunification: Competing constructions of contemporary Germany, is a rich and diverse collection of current sociolinguistic and discourse-analytic research into the German language. It aims to explore Germany's continued cultural and linguistic East/West divide, a decade after unification. The volume's 13 contributions are divided into two parts: critical discourse-analytic approaches to public discourses, and micro-analytic approaches to private or semi-public speech genres and communicative practices. The contributions in the first part are presented as "part of the analytical creation of … discourses" which seek to "punctur[e] the dominant western story, and by this very act, creating space for the expression of other memories, experiences and historiographies, and the emergence of alternative discourses" (p. 8). In contrast, the chapters in the second part have the more descriptive aim of documenting linguistic difference in East and West. The editors contend that "profound differences in communicative practices and behaviours between east and west Germans" exist, or are perceived to exist, and that these differences "constitute a significant barrier to the project of bringing a united … Germany into existence".

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Language in Society Vol. 31, Issue 2, which you can read on Cambridge's site .



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