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Latin: A Linguistic Introduction

By Renato Oniga and Norma Shifano

Applies the principles of contemporary linguistics to the study of Latin and provides clear explanations of grammatical rules alongside diagrams to illustrate complex structures.


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The Ancient Language, and the Dialect of Cornwall, with an Enlarged Glossary of Cornish Provincial Words

By Frederick W.P. Jago

Containing around 3,700 dialect words from both Cornish and English,, this glossary was published in 1882 by Frederick W. P. Jago (1817–92) in an effort to describe and preserve the dialect as it too declined and it is an invaluable record of a disappearing dialect and way of life.


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Linguistic Bibliography for the Year 2013

The Linguistic Bibliography is by far the most comprehensive bibliographic reference work in the field. This volume contains up-to-date and extensive indexes of names, languages, and subjects.



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Dissertation Information


Title: The Construction of Language Attitudes, English(es), and Identities in Written Accounts of Japanese Youths Add Dissertation
Author: Akihiro Saito Update Dissertation
Email: click here to access email
Degree Awarded: University of Southern Queensland , Doctor of Philosophy
Completed in:
2013
Linguistic Subfield(s): Applied Linguistics
Director(s): Warren Midgley
Shirley O'Neill

Abstract: This dissertation reports a study that explored the discursive construction
of language attitudes, Englishes, and language learners' identities in
written discourses. The data was elicited from a culturally amenable
writing mode called shoronbun (expository type essay) written by Japanese
college students. An analysis of their accounts revealed a range of
diverse, at times contested, meanings and images of the global language,
English. Identified in the construction of these images were attitudes as
evaluative practices and meticulous discursive moves to which the
participants resorted in pursuit of a tenable argumentative position in
concord with one's moral order.