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Latin: A Linguistic Introduction

By Renato Oniga and Norma Shifano

Applies the principles of contemporary linguistics to the study of Latin and provides clear explanations of grammatical rules alongside diagrams to illustrate complex structures.


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The Ancient Language, and the Dialect of Cornwall, with an Enlarged Glossary of Cornish Provincial Words

By Frederick W.P. Jago

Containing around 3,700 dialect words from both Cornish and English,, this glossary was published in 1882 by Frederick W. P. Jago (1817–92) in an effort to describe and preserve the dialect as it too declined and it is an invaluable record of a disappearing dialect and way of life.


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Linguistic Bibliography for the Year 2013

The Linguistic Bibliography is by far the most comprehensive bibliographic reference work in the field. This volume contains up-to-date and extensive indexes of names, languages, and subjects.


Book Information

   

Title: Distributed Reduplication
Written By: John Frampton
URL: http://mitpress.mit.edu/9780262513531
Series Title: Linguistic Inquiry Monographs
Description:

A convincing account of reduplicative phenomena has been a longstanding
problem for rule-based theories of morphophonology. Many scholars believe
that derivational phonology is incapable in principle of analyzing reduplication.
In "Distributed Reduplication", John Frampton demonstrates the adequacy of
rule-based theories by providing a general account within that framework and
illustrating his proposal with extensive examples of widely varying
reduplicatation schemes from many languages. His analysis is based on new
proposals about the structure of autosegmental representations.

Although Frampton offers many new ideas about the computations that are
put to use in reduplicative phonology, some fairly radical, his intent is
conservative: to provide evidence that the model of the phonological
computation developed by Chomsky and Halle in 1968 is fundamentally
correct--that surface forms are produced by the successive modification of
underlying forms. Frampton's theory accounts for the surface properties of
reduplicative morphemes by operations that are distributed at various points
in the morphophonology rather than by a single operation applied at a single
point. Lexical insertion, prosodic adjustment, and copying can each make a
contribution to the output at different points in the computation of surface
form.

Frampton discusses particular reduplicative processes in many languages as
he develops his general theory. The final chapter provides an extensive
sequence of detailed case studies. Appendixes offer additional material on
the No Crossing Constraint, the autosegmental structure of reduplicative
representations, linearization, and concatenative versus nonconcatenative
morphology. This volume will play a major role in the main debate of current
phonological research: what is the nature of the phonological computation?

Publication Year: 2009
Publisher: MIT Press
Review: Read the review
BibTex: View BibTex record
Linguistic Field(s): Morphology
Phonology
Issue: All announcements sent out by The LINGUIST List are emailed to our subscribers and archived with the Library of Congress.
Click here to see the original emailed issue.

Versions:
Format: Hardback
ISBN: 0262013266
ISBN-13: 9780262013260
Pages: 220
Prices: U.S. $ 64

 
 
Format: Paperback
ISBN: 0262513536
ISBN-13: 9780262513531
Pages: 220
Prices: U.S. $ 32