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Language Planning as a Sociolinguistic Experiment

By: Ernst Jahr

Provides richly detailed insight into the uniqueness of the Norwegian language development. Marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of the Norwegian nation following centuries of Danish rule


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Acquiring Phonology: A Cross-Generational Case-Study

By Neil Smith

The study also highlights the constructs of current linguistic theory, arguing for distinctive features and the notion 'onset' and against some of the claims of Optimality Theory and Usage-based accounts.


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Language Production and Interpretation: Linguistics meets Cognition

By Henk Zeevat

The importance of Henk Zeevat's new monograph cannot be overstated. [...] I recommend it to anyone who combines interests in language, logic, and computation [...]. David Beaver, University of Texas at Austin


Book Information

   

Title: The Emergence of Protolanguage
Subtitle: Holophrasis vs compositionality
Edited By: MIchaelAArbib
URL: http://www.benjamins.com/cgi-bin/t_bookview.cgi?bookid=BCT%2024
Series Title: Benjamins Current Topics 24
Description:

Somewhere and somehow, in the 5 to 7 million years since the last common
ancestors of humans and the great apes, our ancestors “got” language. The
authors of this volume all agree that there was no single mutation or
cultural innovation that took our ancestors directly from a limited system
of a few vocalizations (primarily innate) and gestures (some learned) to
language. They further agree to use the term “protolanguage” for the
beginnings of an open system of symbolic communication that provided the
bridge to the use of fully expressive languages, rich in both lexicon and
grammar. But here consensus ends, and the theories presented here range
from the compositional view that protolanguage was based primarily
on words akin to the nouns and verbs, etc., we know today with only syntax
lacking to the holophrastic view that protolanguage used protowords
which had no meaningful subunits which might nonetheless refer to complex
but significantly recurrent events.

The present volume does not decide the matter but it does advance our
understanding. The lack of any direct archaeological record of
protolanguage might seem to raise insuperable difficulties. However, this
volume exhibits the diversity of
methodologies that can be brought to bear in developing datasets that can
be used to advance the debate.

These articles were originally published as Interaction Studies 9:1 (2008).

Publication Year: 2010
Publisher: John Benjamins
Review: Not available for review. If you would like to review a book on The LINGUIST List, please login to view the AFR list.
BibTex: View BibTex record
Linguistic Field(s): Historical Linguistics
History of Linguistics
Issue: All announcements sent out by The LINGUIST List are emailed to our subscribers and archived with the Library of Congress.
Click here to see the original emailed issue.

Versions:
Format: Electronic
ISBN-13: 9789027287823
Prices: EuropeEURO 85.00
 
Format: Hardback
ISBN-13: 9789027222541
Prices: U.K.£ 85.00
EuropeEURO 90.10
U.S.$ 128.00
 
Format: Electronic
ISBN-13: 9789027287823
Prices: U.S.$ 128.00