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The Social Origins of Language

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Presents a new theoretical framework for the origins of human language and sets key issues in language evolution in their wider context within biological and cultural evolution


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Preposition Placement in English: A Usage-Based Approach

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Title: A Typology of Verbal Derivation in Ethiopian Afro-Asiatic Languages
Written By: Tolemariam Fufa
Series Title: LOT Dissertation Series
Description:

The general objective of this thesis is to determine a typology of verbal
derivation in Ethiopian Afro-Asiatic languages. As a starting point I
analyse the major verbal derivations of causative, middle and passive of
Oromo, Amharic and Shakkinoono. These three languages serve as
representatives of respectively the Cushitic, Semitic and Omotic
Afroasiatic subfamilies that are present in Ethiopia. These languages have
been chosen because the author has deeper knowledge of them, as a speaker
and a researcher. The analysis of the syntax and semantics of the causative
in Oromo and Amharic reveals interesting issues such as intransitive
causatives and impersonal causatives. Oromo is particularly rich in
multiple causative structures and these are analysed in depth. Shakkinoono
(and closely related Kafinoonoo) pose some challenges to a descriptive
analysis in that thematic stem final vowels have to be distinguished from
formely identical causative and middle/passive suffixes. The middle and
passive are separate morphemes in Oromo, and Cushitic languages in general,
but indistinguishable in Amharic (and Semitic) and Shakkinoono (and Omotic).

The meaning ranges of the middle are considered in the three languages.
Passives can be made of both patient and agent oriented intransitive verbs
which is cross-linguistically rare. The semantics of such impersonal
passives are discussed.

This study should be of interest to linguists working on Afro-Asiatic
languages, to typologists and to syntacticians particularly those working
on argument structure.

Publication Year: 2009
Publisher: Netherlands Graduate School of Linguistics / Landelijke (LOT)
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BibTex: View BibTex record
Linguistic Field(s): Morphology
Semantics
Syntax
Typology
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Versions:
Format: Paperback
ISBN-13: 9789460930133