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Language Planning as a Sociolinguistic Experiment

By: Ernst Jahr

Provides richly detailed insight into the uniqueness of the Norwegian language development. Marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of the Norwegian nation following centuries of Danish rule


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Acquiring Phonology: A Cross-Generational Case-Study

By Neil Smith

The study also highlights the constructs of current linguistic theory, arguing for distinctive features and the notion 'onset' and against some of the claims of Optimality Theory and Usage-based accounts.


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Language Production and Interpretation: Linguistics meets Cognition

By Henk Zeevat

The importance of Henk Zeevat's new monograph cannot be overstated. [...] I recommend it to anyone who combines interests in language, logic, and computation [...]. David Beaver, University of Texas at Austin


Book Information

   

Title: The Genesis of Grammar
Subtitle: A Reconstruction
URL: http://www.oup.com/uk/catalogue/?ci=9780199227761
Description:

This book reconstructs what the earliest grammars might have been and shows
how they could have led to the languages of modern humankind.

"Like other biological phenomena, language cannot be fully understood
without reference to its evolution, whether proven or hypothesized," wrote
Talmy Givón in 2002. As the languages spoken 8,000 years ago were
typologically much the same as they are today and as no direct evidence
exists for languages before then, evolutionary linguists are at a
disadvantage compared to their counterparts in biology. Bernd Heine and
Tania Kuteva seek to overcome this obstacle by combining grammaticalization
theory, one of the main methods of historical linguistics, with work in
animal communication and human evolution. The questions they address
include: do the modern languages derive from one ancestral language or from
more than one? What was the structure of language like when it first
evolved? And how did the properties associated with modern human languages
arise, in particular syntax and the recursive use of language structures?
The authors proceed on the assumption that if language evolution is the
result of language change then the reconstruction of the former can be
explored by deploying the processes involved in the latter. Their measured
arguments and crystal-clear exposition will appeal to all those interested
in the evolution of language, from advanced undergraduates to linguists,
cognitive scientists, human biologists, and archaeologists.

Publication Year: 2007
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Review: Not available for review. If you would like to review a book on The LINGUIST List, please login to view the AFR list.
BibTex: View BibTex record
Linguistic Field(s): Historical Linguistics
Cognitive Science
Issue: All announcements sent out by The LINGUIST List are emailed to our subscribers and archived with the Library of Congress.
Click here to see the original emailed issue.

Versions:
Format: Hardback
ISBN: 0199227764
ISBN-13: 9780199227761
Pages: 440
Prices: U.K.£ 75.00

 
 
Format: Paperback
ISBN: 0199227772
ISBN-13: 9780199227778
Pages: 440
Prices: U.K.£ 25.99