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Title: Extremely Common 'Eloquence'
Subtitle: Constructing Scottish identity through narrative
Written By: Ronald K. S. Macaulay
URL: http://www.rodopi.nl/senj.asp?BookId=SCROLL+4
Series Title: SCROLL: Scottish Cultural Review of Language and Literature Vol. 4
Description:

'Extremely Common Eloquence' presents a detailed analysis of the narrative
and rhetorical skills employed by working-class Scots in talking about
important aspects of their lives. The wide range of devices employed by
the speakers and the high quality of the examples provide convincing
evidence to reject any possible negative evaluation of working-class
speech on the basis of details of non-standard pronunciation and grammar.
In addition to this display of linguistic accomplishment the examples
examined show how these skills are employed to communicate important
aspects of Scottish identity and culture.

Although the political status of Scotland has fluctuated over the past four
hundred years, the sense of Scottish identity has remained strong. Part of
that sense of identity comes from a form of speech that remains markedly
distinct from that of the dominant neighbour to the south. There are
cultural attitudes that indicate a spirit of independence that is
consistent with this linguistic difference. The ways in which the speakers
in this book express themselves reveal their beliefs in egalitarianism,
independence, and the value of hard work. 'Extremely Common Eloquence'
demonstrates how the methods of linguistic analysis can be combined with an
investigation into cultural values.

Contents
Preface
List of speakers
Chapter One: The Study of Language
Chapter Two: The Problems of Transcription
Chapter Three: A Small Soap Opera
Chapter Four: The Uses of Dialogue
Chapter Five: The Significance of Stories
Chapter Six: Third Person Narratives
Chapter Seven: A Stylistic Anomaly
Chapter Eight: Family Stories
Chapter Nine: The Auld Scotch Tongue
Chapter Ten: The Culture of Jock Tamson’s Bairns
Chapter Eleven: The Poetry of Talk
Chapter Twelve: Discover the People
Appendix A: Len M.'s Trip to Russia and Two Versions of a Story
Appendix B: Bill Dalgleish's Story
Appendix C: Bella K.'s Father
Glossary
Bibliography
Index

Publication Year: 2006
Publisher: Rodopi
Review: Not available for review. If you would like to review a book on The LINGUIST List, please login to view the AFR list.
BibTex: View BibTex record
Linguistic Field(s): Pragmatics
Sociolinguistics
Subject Language(s): English
Issue: All announcements sent out by The LINGUIST List are emailed to our subscribers and archived with the Library of Congress.
Click here to see the original emailed issue.

Versions:
Format: Paperback
ISBN: 9042017740
ISBN-13: N/A
Pages: 299
Prices: Europe EURO 25.00

 
 
Format: Paperback
ISBN: 9042017643
ISBN-13: N/A
Pages: 299
Prices: Europe EURO 90.00