LINGUIST List 5.329

Tue 22 Mar 1994

Qs: Women's studies, Pronominals, Indexing/Frequency, Dialect

Editor for this issue: <>


Directory

  1. Mireia Trenchs, Women's studies
  2. John Goldsmith, French vs English pronominalization
  3. Y. Shum, Automatic Indexing/Frequency analysis
  4. Heather Jo Anderson, 'There's alot'

Message 1: Women's studies

Date: Tue, 22 Mar 94 13:30:37 MEWomen's studies
From: Mireia Trenchs <mtrenchsupf.es>
Subject: Women's studies

A colleague of mine from Spain specialized in analysis of fiction written
by female immigrants would like to get in touch with groups of research or
university departments in the US which share this interest. She is mostly
interested in research centers in California since she has been awarded a
scholarship to conduct research in that state.

We will appreciate any tips regarding this issue.

Mireia Trenchs
Universitat Pompeu Fabra
Barcelona, Spain
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 2: French vs English pronominalization

Date: Mon, 21 Mar 94 16:06:52 GMFrench vs English pronominalization
From: John Goldsmith <gldsmthbloomfield.uchicago.edu>
Subject: French vs English pronominalization

I came across the following sentence last night in a novel:

(i) elle piquerait son os a un chien,
lit., she would steal his bone to [i.e., from] a dog.

My question is: in what respect do English and French differ,
so that French countenances (i), but English does not allow
the sentences in (ii)
(with the intended coreferential readings) (in my humble
opinion) ?

(ii) She would steal his bone from a dog.
 She would rob his candy from a baby.
 She bought his self-portrait from a street artist.
 As an editor, I'm so tough that I'd send
 his manuscript back to a best-selling novelist if I

 felt like it.
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 3: Automatic Indexing/Frequency analysis

Date: Mon, 21 Mar 94 22:50:13 ESAutomatic Indexing/Frequency analysis
From: Y. Shum <shuychonmehta.anu.edu.au>
Subject: Automatic Indexing/Frequency analysis

Hi there,
 One of the task in my project involves creating a software to
extract keywords/key phrases from a text. At the moment, I have
reached the stage where I could obtain the frequency of keywords of
a document. I know that there are 101 ways of proceeding from here.
Yet I'm not really sure of the proper algorithm to perform the frequency
 analysis and subsequently deriving key phrases from them.

 Will appreciate and acknolwedge any hints/suggestions of how to proceed from
here.

Thank you very very much.
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 4: 'There's alot'

Date: Mon, 21 Mar 1994 17:57:38 'There's alot'
From: Heather Jo Anderson <anderso3student.msu.edu>
Subject: 'There's alot'

I am a native of Michigan, a Linguistics student at Michigan State, and very
puzzled about a certain aspect of my speech: in casual conversation I often
say things like
 'There's alot of people here tonight.'
 'There's over 20 students in my seminar class.'
 'There's a few quirks in this paper that I just can't work out.'
 etc.

I realize that there is blatant disagreement between the verbs (contracted
'is') and the objects ('alot of people', 'over 20 students', 'a few quirks',
etc.) of these sentences; but they also sound perfectly natural to me. Can
anyone help explain this? Is it a dialectal phenomena? I am very curious.
Thank you in advance for all replies,

Heather Anderson
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue