LINGUIST List 4.548

Wed 14 Jul 1993

Books: Phonetics and Phonology

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Additional information on the following books, as well as a short backlist of the publisher's titles, may be available from the Listserv for some of the publishers listed here. To get this information, simply send a message to: Listservtamvm1.tamu.edu (Internet) or Listservtamvm1 (Bitnet) The message should consist of the single line: get publishername lst linguist For example, to get more information on a book published by Mouton de Gruyter, send the message: get mouton lst linguist At the moment, the following lists are available: benjamin lst (John Benjamin) mouton lst (Mouton de Gruyter) oup lst (Oxford University Press) sil lst (Summer Institute of Linguistics) uma-glsa lst (U. of Massachusetts Graduate Linguistics Association)

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  1. I, Phonetics and Phonology

Message 1: Phonetics and Phonology

Date: Wed 14 Jul 1993
From: I <>
Subject: Phonetics and Phonology
PHONOLOGY

Couper-Kuhlen, Elizabeth ENGLISH SPEECH RHYTHM. FORM AND FUNCTION
IN EVERYDAY VERBAL INTERACTION Phonology & Phonetics
 John Benjamins 1993 viii, 346 pp. lang
 Cloth US:1 55619 293 2/EUR:90 272 5037 5 US$75.00/Hfl. 130.--
Reconsiders the question of speech isochrony, the regular recurrence of
(stressed) syllables in time, from an empirical point of view. Suggests
that speech rhythm patterns at turn transitions in everyday English
conversation are not random occurrences or the result of a social-
psychological adaptation process but are contextualization cues which
figure systematically in the creation and interpretation of linguistic
meaning in communication.

PHONETICS

Olive, J.P., A. Greenwood, J. Coleman, ACOUSTICS OF AMERICAN ENGLISH SPEECH,
 1993. x + 396 pp., 211 illus. Hardcover. ISBN 0-387-97984-0 US$ 59.00.
 Springer-Verlag New York.
 Acoustics, Phonetics
A comprehensive description of the acoustics of American English speech, with
numerous spectrograms and other illustrations showing characteristics of vowels
and consonants, their acoustic interactions in fluent English speech, and the
variability of speech due to the differences between speakers and dialects.
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